Recent Acquisition

MONASH GALLERY OF ART

The unique print  ‘Lips’ from the series ‘Puncture’ has been acquired for the Monash Gallery of Art (MGA) collection

http://www.mga.org.au/collection

‘Lips’, from the series ‘Puncture’, 2014, Type-C Photograph, clear acrylic frame and bracket, screws, 58 x 82.5 x 3.5cm

‘Lips’, from the series ‘Puncture’, 2014, Type-C Photograph, clear acrylic frame and bracket, screws, 58 x 82.5 x 3.5cm

‘Lips’, from the series ‘Puncture’, 2014, Type-C Photograph, clear acrylic frame and bracket, screws, 58 x 82.5 x 3.5cm

‘Lips’, from the series ‘Puncture’, 2014, Type-C Photograph, clear acrylic frame and bracket, screws, 58 x 82.5 x 3.5cm

‘Lips’, from the series ‘Puncture’, 2014, Type-C Photograph, clear acrylic frame and bracket, screws, 58 x 82.5 x 3.5cm

‘Lips’, from the series ‘Puncture’, 2014, Type-C Photograph, clear acrylic frame and bracket, screws, 58 x 82.5 x 3.5cm

Detail, ‘Lips’, from the series ‘Puncture’, 2014, Type-C Photograph, clear acrylic frame and bracket, screws, 58 x 82.5 x 3.5cm

Detail, ‘Lips’, from the series ‘Puncture’, 2014, Type-C Photograph, clear acrylic frame and bracket, screws, 58 x 82.5 x 3.5cm

 

Artist Statement ‘A photograph is a three dimensional thing, not only a two-dimensional image. As such, photographs exist materially in the world, as chemical deposits on paper’. (J. Lecthe, Beyond the Ontology of the Image? http://eitherand.org/photographys-new-materiality/beyond-ontology-image/ accessed 1 April 2014)

‘Puncture’ explores the fragile, transformative and resilient qualities of paper. Created using a process that involves reworking photographic prints with a fine needle. Thousands of tiny pinpricks painstakingly applied through the surface of paper form beautiful embroidered patterns that are visible on both the front and the back of the print. When viewed from the emulsion / image side, light visibly bleeds through the fine holes in the paper. When viewed from the non-emulsion / white side of the print, finely detailed upraised embossed patterns, tracing the details in the photographic image on the other side, are visible. The embossing highlights the tactile and material qualities of the paper and the photograph. Instead of threatening the integrity of the paper, the patterns and markings, created through the process of piercing the paper, magically reveal the resilient, generative and transformative properties of paper.

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